Author Archives: cooplab

Coop lab at PEGQ

Emily Josephs. Detecting polygenic adaptation in maize. 11:20am – 11:40am Mon, May 14 Erin Calfee. Methods for detecting selection in admixed populations. Short talk: 4:30pm – 4:35pm Mon, May 14. Poster (56M) 8:00pm – 9:00pm Mon, May 14 Doc Edge. … Continue reading

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How lucky was the genetic investigation in the Golden State Killer case?

Last week, police arrested Joseph DeAngelo as a suspect in case of the Golden State Killer, an infamous serial murderer and rapist whose case has been open for over forty years. The arrest is huge news in and of itself, … Continue reading

Posted in genetic genealogy | 4 Comments

Polygenic scores and tea drinking

Debates over the contribution of genetics to differences among populations have a long and contentious history. We have known for a long time that nearly all traits are partially heritable, meaning that genetic differences are associated with differences in phenotypes … Continue reading

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Where did your genetic ancestors come from?

[Part of a continuing set of blog posts on genetics and genealogy] In the last post I described how you are descended from a vast number of ancestors, from all over the world. But how much of your genome traces … Continue reading

Posted in genetic genealogy, popgen teaching | 11 Comments

Your ancestors lived all over the world

In the last post I discussed the idea that that we are all related in the recent past (building off the work of Chang, Derrida, and colleagues). This idea can be confusing; for many of us our ancestors all seem … Continue reading

Posted in genetic genealogy | 2 Comments

Our vast, shared family tree.

You might not like to admit it, but you’re related to me. It’s very unlikely that you’re my sibling (I’m not even sure if my family read these posts). You’re one of over seven billion people alive today, and I … Continue reading

Posted in genetic genealogy | 5 Comments

Genomics of Isolation by distance in Florida Scrub Jays

Stepfanie Aguillon and Nancy Chen‘s paper on combining genomics and genealogy to study isolation by distance is out in PLOS Genetics.

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